The Great Silk Alternative: Multiple Co-Evolution of Web Loss and Sticky Hairs in Spiders

@article{Wolff2013TheGS,
  title={The Great Silk Alternative: Multiple Co-Evolution of Web Loss and Sticky Hairs in Spiders},
  author={Jonas O. Wolff and Wolfgang Nentwig and Stanislav N. Gorb},
  journal={PLoS ONE},
  year={2013},
  volume={8}
}
Spiders are the most important terrestrial predators among arthropods. Their ecological success is reflected by a high biodiversity and the conquest of nearly every terrestrial habitat. Spiders are closely associated with silk, a material, often seen to be responsible for their great ecological success and gaining high attention in life sciences. However, it is often overlooked that more than half of all Recent spider species have abandoned web building or never developed such an adaptation… 

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