The Great Reversal in the Demand for Skill and Cognitive Tasks

@article{Beaudry2016TheGR,
  title={The Great Reversal in the Demand for Skill and Cognitive Tasks},
  author={Paul Beaudry and David A. Green and Benjamin M. Sand},
  journal={Journal of Labor Economics},
  year={2016},
  volume={34},
  pages={S199 - S247}
}
This paper argues that several of the poor labor market outcomes observed in the Great Recession can be traced back to a change in the demand pattern for skilled workers that started with the tech bust of 2000. In particular, we show that around the year 2000, the demand for cognitive tasks underwent a reversal. In response, high-skilled workers moved down the occupational ladder and increasingly displaced lower-educated workers in less skill-intensive jobs. While these effects were present… 

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