The Great Ocean-Going Ships of Southern China in the Age of Chinese Maritime Voyaging to India, Twelfth to Fifteenth Centuries

@article{Wake1997TheGO,
  title={The Great Ocean-Going Ships of Southern China in the Age of Chinese Maritime Voyaging to India, Twelfth to Fifteenth Centuries},
  author={Christopher Wake},
  journal={International Journal of Maritime History},
  year={1997},
  volume={9},
  pages={51 - 81}
}
  • C. Wake
  • Published 1 December 1997
  • History
  • International Journal of Maritime History
In recent years the most significant contributions to the history of Chinese shipping and shipbuilding have been made by marine archaeologists. Yet valuable information may still be gleaned from well-known literary sources where archaeological findings can be used to clarify the meaning of a text or where evidence from previously unconsidered sources can be brought to bear on some particular interpretive problem. One such problem concerns the size of the great ocean-going junks which regularly… 
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