The Great Divides: Ardipithecus ramidus Reveals the Postcrania of Our Last Common Ancestors with African Apes

@article{Lovejoy2009TheGD,
  title={The Great Divides: Ardipithecus ramidus Reveals the Postcrania of Our Last Common Ancestors with African Apes},
  author={C. Owen Lovejoy and Gen Suwa and Scott W. Simpson and Jay H Matternes and Tim D. White},
  journal={Science},
  year={2009},
  volume={326},
  pages={106 - 73}
}
Genomic comparisons have established the chimpanzee and bonobo as our closest living relatives. However, the intricacies of gene regulation and expression caution against the use of these extant apes in deducing the anatomical structure of the last common ancestor that we shared with them. Evidence for this structure must therefore be sought from the fossil record. Until now, that record has provided few relevant data because available fossils were too recent or too incomplete. Evidence from… 
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