The Great American Interchange in birds: a phylogenetic perspective with the genus Trogon

@article{DaCosta2008TheGA,
  title={The Great American Interchange in birds: a phylogenetic perspective with the genus Trogon},
  author={Jeffrey M. DaCosta and John Klicka},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2008},
  volume={17}
}
The ‘Great American Interchange’ (GAI) is recognized as having had a dramatic effect on biodiversity throughout the Neotropics. However, investigation of patterns in Neotropical avian biodiversity has generally been focused on South American taxa in the Amazon Basin, leaving the contribution of Central American taxa under‐studied. More rigorous studies of lineages distributed across the entire Neotropics are needed to uncover phylogeographical patterns throughout the area, offering insights… Expand
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