The GnRH System of Seasonal Breeders: Anatomy and Plasticity

@article{Lehman1997TheGS,
  title={The GnRH System of Seasonal Breeders: Anatomy and Plasticity},
  author={M. Lehman and R. L. Goodman and F. Karsch and G. L. Jackson and S. Berriman and H. Jansen},
  journal={Brain Research Bulletin},
  year={1997},
  volume={44},
  pages={445-457}
}
Seasonal breeders, such as sheep and hamsters, by virtue of their annual cycles of reproduction, represent valuable models for the study of plasticity in the adult mammalian neuroendocrine brain. A major factor responsible for the occurrence of seasonal reproductive transitions is a striking change in the responsiveness of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons to the inhibitory effects of gonadal steroids. However, the neural circuitry mediating these seasonal changes is still… Expand
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Publisher Summary This chapter discusses the strategy of seasonal breeding, the role of photoperiod in timing the annual reproductive cycle, the hypothalamo-pituitary mechanisms that mediateExpand
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