The Glorious Cause: The American Revolution, 1763-1789

@article{Brown1982TheGC,
  title={The Glorious Cause: The American Revolution, 1763-1789},
  author={Richard Danson Brown and Robert L. Middlekauff},
  journal={Journal of Interdisciplinary History},
  year={1982},
  volume={14},
  pages={695}
}
The first book to appear in the illustrious Oxford History of the United States, this critically acclaimed volume-a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize-offers an unsurpassed history of the Revolutionary War and the birth of the American republic. Beginning with the French and Indian War and continuing to the election of George Washington as first president, Robert Middlekauff offers a panoramic history of the conflict between England and America, highlighting the drama and anguish of the colonial… Expand
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