The Global Stock of Domesticated Honey Bees Is Growing Slower Than Agricultural Demand for Pollination

@article{Aizen2009TheGS,
  title={The Global Stock of Domesticated Honey Bees Is Growing Slower Than Agricultural Demand for Pollination},
  author={M. Aizen and L. Harder},
  journal={Current Biology},
  year={2009},
  volume={19},
  pages={915-918}
}
  • M. Aizen, L. Harder
  • Published 2009
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Current Biology
  • The prospect that a global pollination crisis currently threatens agricultural productivity has drawn intense recent interest among scientists, politicians, and the general public. To date, evidence for a global crisis has been drawn from regional or local declines in pollinators themselves or insufficient pollination for particular crops. In contrast, our analysis of Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) data reveals that the global population of managed honey-bee hives has increased… CONTINUE READING
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