The Global Plight of Pollinators

@article{Tylianakis2013TheGP,
  title={The Global Plight of Pollinators},
  author={J. Tylianakis},
  journal={Science},
  year={2013},
  volume={339},
  pages={1532 - 1533}
}
Wild pollinators are in decline, and managed honeybees cannot compensate for their loss. [Also see Reports by Garibaldi et al. and Burkle et al.] Three-quarters of global food crops depend at least partly on pollination by animals, usually insects (1). These crops form an increasing fraction of global food demand (2). Given this importance, widespread declines in pollinator diversity (3) have led to concern about a global “pollination crisis” (4). However, others have argued that this concern… Expand
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