The Global Decline of Nonmarine Mollusks

@inproceedings{Lydeard2004TheGD,
  title={The Global Decline of Nonmarine Mollusks},
  author={Charles Lydeard and Robert H. Cowie and Winston F. Ponder and Arthur E. Bogan and Philippe Bouchet and Stephanie A. Clark and Kevin S Cummings and Terrence J. Frest and Olivier Gargominy and David Herbert and Robert Hershler and Kathryn E. Perez and Barry Roth and Mary B. Seddon and Ellen E. Strong and Fred G. Thompson},
  year={2004}
}
Abstract Invertebrate species represent more than 99% of animal diversity; however, they receive much less publicity and attract disproportionately minor research effort relative to vertebrates. Nonmarine mollusks (i.e., terrestrial and freshwater) are one of the most diverse and imperiled groups of animals, although not many people other than a few specialists who study the group seem to be aware of their plight. Nonmarine mollusks include a number of phylogenetically disparate lineages and… 
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