The Girl Who Cried Pain: A Bias against Women in the Treatment of Pain

@article{Hoffmann2001TheGW,
  title={The Girl Who Cried Pain: A Bias against Women in the Treatment of Pain},
  author={Diane E Hoffmann and Anita J Tarzian},
  journal={The Journal of Law, Medicine \& Ethics},
  year={2001},
  volume={28},
  pages={13 - 27}
}
To the woman, God said, “I will greatly multiply your pain in child bearing; in pain you shall bring forth children, yet your desire shall be for your husband, and he shall rule over you.”Genesis 3:16 There is now a well-established body of literature documenting the pervasive inadequate treatment of pain in this country. There have also been allegations, and some data, supporting the notion that women are more likely than men to be undertreated or inappropriately diagnosed and treated for… Expand
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