The Genomic Formation of Human Populations in East Asia

@article{Wang2020TheGF,
  title={The Genomic Formation of Human Populations in East Asia},
  author={Chuan‐Chao Wang and Hui-Yuan Yeh and Alexander N. Popov and Huqin Zhang and Hirofumi Matsumura and Kendra A. Sirak and Olivia Cheronet and Alexey Kovalev and Nadin Rohland and Alexander M. Kim and Rebecca Bernardos and Dashtseveg Tumen and Jing Zhao and Yi-Chang Liu and Jiun-Yu Liu and Matthew Mah and Swapan Mallick and Ke Wang and Zhao Zhang and Nicole Adamski and Nasreen Broomandkhoshbacht and Kimberly Callan and Brendan Culleton and Laurie Eccles and Ann Marie Lawson and Megan Michel and Jonas Oppenheimer and Kristin Stewardson and Shao-qing Wen and Shi Yan and Fatma Zalzala and Richard Y. Chuang and Ching-Jung Huang and Chung-Ching Shiung and Yuri G. Nikitin and Andrei V. Tabarev and Alexey A. Tishkin and Song Lin and Zhouyong Sun and Xiao-Ming Wu and Tie-Lin Yang and Xi Hu and Liang Chen and Hua Du and Jamsranjav Bayarsaikhan and Enkhbayar Mijiddorj and Diimaajav Erdenebaatar and T. Iderkhangai and Erdene Myagmar and Hideaki Kanzawa-Kiriyama and Msato Nishino and Ken-ichi Shinoda and O. Shubina and Jianxin Guo and Qiong-ying Deng and Longli Kang and Dawei Li and Dong-na Li and Rong Lin and Wangwei Cai and Rukesh Shrestha and Lingxiang Wang and Lanhai Wei and Guangmao Xie and Hongbing Yao and Manfei Zhang and Guanglin He and Xiaomin Yang and Rong Hu and Martine Robbeets and Stephan Schiffels and Douglas J. Kennett and Li Jin and Hui Li and Johannes Krause and Ron Pinhasi and David Reich},
  journal={bioRxiv},
  year={2020}
}
The deep population history of East Asia remains poorly understood due to a lack of ancient DNA data and sparse sampling of present-day people. We report genome-wide data from 191 individuals from Mongolia, northern China, Taiwan, the Amur River Basin and Japan dating to 6000 BCE – 1000 CE, many from contexts never previously analyzed with ancient DNA. We also report 383 present-day individuals from 46 groups mostly from the Tibetan Plateau and southern China. We document how 6000-3600 BCE… 
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