The Genome Sequence of the SARS-Associated Coronavirus

@article{Marra2003TheGS,
  title={The Genome Sequence of the SARS-Associated Coronavirus},
  author={Marco A. Marra and Steven J. M. Jones and Caroline Ruth Astell and Robert A. Holt and Angela R. Brooks-Wilson and Yaron S. N. Butterfield and Jaswinder S. Khattra and Jennifer Asano and Sarah A. Barber and Susanna Y. Chan and Alison Cloutier and Shaun M. Coughlin and Doug Freeman and Noreen Girn and Obi L. Griffith and Stephen R. Leach and Michael Mayo and Helen L McDonald and Stephen B. Montgomery and Pawan Pandoh and Anca S. Petrescu and A. Gordon Robertson and Jacqueline E. Schein and Asim Siddiqui and Duane E. Smailus and Jeff M. Stott and George S. Yang and Francis A. Plummer and Anton Andonov and Harvey Artsob and Nathalie Bastien and Kathy Bernard and Timothy F. Booth and Donnie Bowness and Martin Czub and Michael A. Drebot and Lisa Fernando and Ramon Flick and Michael Garbutt and Michael Gray and Allen Grolla and Steven Jones and Heinz Feldmann and Adrienne F A Meyers and Amin M. Kabani and Yan Li and Susan Normand and Ute Stroher and Graham Tipples and Shaun D. Tyler and Robert Vogrig and Diane Ward and Brynn Watson and Robert C. Brunham and Mel Krajden and Martin Petric and Danuta M. Skowronski and Chris Upton and Rachel L. Roper},
  journal={Science},
  year={2003},
  volume={300},
  pages={1399 - 1404}
}
We sequenced the 29,751-base genome of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)–associated coronavirus known as the Tor2 isolate. The genome sequence reveals that this coronavirus is only moderately related to other known coronaviruses, including two human coronaviruses, HCoV-OC43 and HCoV-229E. Phylogenetic analysis of the predicted viral proteins indicates that the virus does not closely resemble any of the three previously known groups of coronaviruses. The genome sequence will aid in… Expand
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