The Geneva Conventions of 1949

@article{Yingling1952TheGC,
  title={The Geneva Conventions of 1949},
  author={Raymund T. Yingling and Robert W. Ginnane},
  journal={American Journal of International Law},
  year={1952},
  volume={46},
  pages={393 - 427}
}
The Diplomatic Conference for the Establishment of International Conventions for the Protection of War Victims was convened by the Swiss Government and met at Geneva from April 21 to August 12, 1949. Sixty-three governments were represented at the Conference, fifty-nine of whom had full voting powers, while the remaining four attended as observers. 

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