Corpus ID: 34310798

The Genetic Environment of Melanesia : Clines , Clusters and Contact

@inproceedings{Cox2008TheGE,
  title={The Genetic Environment of Melanesia : Clines , Clusters and Contact},
  author={Murray P. Cox},
  year={2008}
}
Current reconstructions of prehistory mostly reject early attempts to force artificial classifications on the Indo-Pacific region, such as the tripartite division of Melanesia, Micronesia and Polynesia historically defined by Dumont d’Urville. Instead, the modern anthropological community embraces a more fluid view of human society, in which communities change through time and space, experience internal developments, and interact with surrounding groups. However, such a pliant conception… Expand

Figures from this paper

The Indonesian archipelago: an ancient genetic highway linking Asia and the Pacific
TLDR
It is shown that Indonesian communities are trending away from the matri- or ambilocality of early Austronesian societies toward the more common practice of patrilocal residence today, and patterns of genetic diversity show that women moved more widely in earlier times. Expand
An ongoing Austronesian expansion in Island Southeast Asia
The Austronesian expansion into Island Southeast Asia and the Pacific was the last and most far-reaching prehistoric human migration. Austronesian languages replaced indigenous languages over nearlyExpand
Holocene Population History in the Pacific Region as a Model for Worldwide Food Producer Dispersals
Pacific prehistory (excluding Australia) since 3000 BC reflects the impacts of two source regions for food production: China from the Yangzi southward (including Taiwan) and the western PacificExpand
Major east-west division underlies Y chromosome stratification across Indonesia.
TLDR
A four-phase colonization model is put forward in which Paleolithic migrations of hunter-gatherers shape the primary structure of current Indonesian Y chromosome diversity, and Neolithic incursions make only a minor impact on the paternal gene pool, despite the large cultural impact of the Austronesian expansion. Expand
Genetic continuity across a deeply divergent linguistic contact zone in North Maluku, Indonesia
TLDR
The data support a model of widespread Asian admixture in North Maluku, likely mediated by the expansion of Austronesian-speaking peoples into the region during the mid Holocene. Expand
Human settlement history between Sunda and Sahul: a focus on East Timor (Timor-Leste) and the Pleistocenic mtDNA diversity
TLDR
This first representative investigation on the mitochondrial DNA variation of East Timor (Timor-Leste) population including >300 individuals puts special emphasis on the reconstruction of the initial settlement, in particular on the previously poorly resolved haplogroup P1, an indigenous lineage of the Southwest Pacific region. Expand
Southeast Asian islands and Oceania: human genetics
The Neolithic period was a time of great change in island Southeast Asia and Oceania. Many characteristics of the peoples living in this region today have their foundation in the Neolithic, includingExpand
Austronesian Speakers and Hereditary Leadership in the Pacific
ABSTRACT This article explores the notion that peoples speaking Austronesian languages brought the ideology of social hierarchy based on hereditary leadership into the Pacific Islands. This socialExpand
Autosomal and X-linked single nucleotide polymorphisms reveal a steep Asian–Melanesian ancestry cline in eastern Indonesia and a sex bias in admixture rates
TLDR
It is concluded that this phenotypic gradient probably reflects mixing of two long-separated ancestral source populations—one descended from the initial Melanesian-like inhabitants of the region, and the other related to Asian groups that immigrated during the Paleolithic and/or with the spread of agriculture. Expand
The obsidian sources and distribution systems emanating from Gaua and Vanua Lava in the Banks Islands of Vanuatu
i Abstract This thesis examines the history of social interaction within communities in the Vanuatu Archipelago and between Vanuatu and other regions in the Western Pacific as reflected by variationsExpand
...
1
2
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 196 REFERENCES
Physical variation and history in Melanesia and Australia.
  • W. Howells
  • Geography, Medicine
  • American journal of physical anthropology
  • 1976
TLDR
It is suggested that the genetic and phenotypic variety is old, that it existed in the previous home of the Australo-Melanesians at least back to 40,000 years ago, and that much of the variation in Melanesia and Australia, including their differences, results from the sampling process involved when different groups out of the original populations made early corssings of the water barriers from OldMelanesia. Expand
Shards of Meaning: Archaeology and the Melanesia-Polynesia Divide
The primary divide between Melanesians and Polynesians, according to Dumont d'Urville, was due to the two groups having separate origins and arrival times in the Pacific. Anthropologists andExpand
Human Demography in the Pleistocene: Do Mitochondrial and Nuclear Genes Tell the Same Story?
TLDR
A popular hypothesis proposes that modern human populations passed through a bottleneck in the late Middle or early Late Pleistocene, at which time there existed perhaps only several thousand breeding individuals, and that this was followed by a rapid, large expansion. Expand
mtDNA and language support a common origin of Micronesians and Polynesians in Island Southeast Asia.
  • J. K. Lum, R. Cann
  • Geography, Medicine
  • American journal of physical anthropology
  • 1998
TLDR
Data indicate extensive gene flow throughout much of Micronesia, but substantial isolation in other Pacific regions, although recent advancements in the understanding of intentional voyaging within Remote Oceania have challenged the existence of the "myth of the primitive isolate". Expand
Mitochondrial DNA variation is an indicator of austronesian influence in Island Melanesia.
TLDR
The hypothesis that this deletion was first introduced to this region about 3,500 years ago with the arrival of Austronesian-speaking peoples from the west has not yet diffused through all populations there, and cannot be reconciled with the competing hypothesis of a primarily indigenous Melanesian origin for the ancestors of the Polynesians. Expand
Melanesian and Asian origins of Polynesians: mtDNA and Y chromosome gradients across the Pacific.
TLDR
Surprisingly, gradients in the frequency distribution of some NRY/mtDNA haplogroups across Polynesia and a gradual west-to-east decrease of overall Nry/mt DNA diversity are identified, providing evidence for a west- to-east direction of Polynesian settlements but also suggesting that Pacific voyaging was regular rather than haphazard. Expand
Melanesian mtDNA Complexity
TLDR
Coalescence estimates based on synonymous transitions in the coding region suggest an initial settlement and expansion in the region at ∼30–50,000 years before present (YBP), and a second important expansion from Island Southeast Asia/Taiwan during the interval ∼3,500–8,000 YBP. Expand
Y chromosomal evidence for the origins of oceanic-speaking peoples.
TLDR
Diversity within the nonrecombining portion of the Y chromosome, which contains within it a relatively simple record of the human past and represents the most informative haplotypic system in the human genome, is assayed. Expand
A predominantly indigenous paternal heritage for the Austronesian-speaking peoples of insular Southeast Asia and Oceania.
TLDR
Using detailed genealogical study of Y chromosome variation, it is shown that the majority of current Austronesian speakers trace their paternal heritage to Pleistocene settlers in the region, as opposed to more-recent agricultural immigrants. Expand
Polynesian origins: insights from the Y chromosome.
  • B. Su, L. Jin, +8 authors R. Deka
  • Geography, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • 2000
TLDR
Southeast Asia provided a genetic source for two independent migrations, one toward Taiwan and the other toward Polynesia through island Southeast Asia, according to the Y-chromosome data. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...