The Gene Ontology project in 2008

@article{Harris2008TheGO,
  title={The Gene Ontology project in 2008},
  author={Midori A. Harris and Jennifer I. Deegan and Amelia Ireland and Jane Lomax and Michael Ashburner and Susan Tweedie and Seth Carbon and Suzanna E. Lewis and Chris J. Mungall and John Richter and Karen Eilbeck and Judith A. Blake and Carol J. Bult and Alexander D. Diehl and Mary Eileen Dolan and Harold J. Drabkin and Janan T. Eppig and David P. Hill and Ni Li and Martin Ringwald and Rama Balakrishnan and Gail Binkley and J. Michael Cherry and Karen R. Christie and Maria C. Costanzo and Qing Dong and Stacia R. Engel and Dianna G. Fisk and Jodi E. Hirschman and Benjamin C. Hitz and Eurie L. Hong and Cynthia J. Krieger and Stuart R. Miyasato and Robert S. Nash and Julie Park and Marek S. Skrzypek and Shuai Weng and Edith D. Wong and Kathy K. Zhu and David Botstein and Kara Dolinski and Michael S. Livstone and Rose Oughtred and Tanya Z. Berardini and Liang Donghui and Seung Yon Rhee and Rolf Apweiler and Daniel Barrell and Evelyn Camon and Emily Dimmer and Rachael P. Huntley and Nicola J. Mulder and Varsha K. Khodiyar and Ruth C. Lovering and Sue Povey and Rex L. Chisholm and Petra Fey and Pascale Gaudet and W. Kibbe and Ranjana Kishore and Erich M. Schwarz and Paul W. Sternberg and Kimberly Van Auken and Michelle G. Giglio and Linda I. Hannick and Jennifer R. Wortman and Martin Aslett and Matthew Berriman and Valerie Wood and Howard J. Jacob and Stanley J. F. Laulederkind and Victoria Petri and Mary Shimoyama and Jennifer L. Smith and Simon N. Twigger and Pankaj Jaiswal and Trent E. Seigfried and Douglas G. Howe and Monte Westerfield and Candace W. Collmer and Trudy Torto Alalibo and Erika Feltrin and Giorgio Valle and Susan Bromberg and Shane C. Burgess and Fiona M. McCarthy},
  journal={Nucleic Acids Research},
  year={2008},
  volume={36},
  pages={D440 - D444}
}
The Gene Ontology (GO) project (http://www.geneontology.org/) provides a set of structured, controlled vocabularies for community use in annotating genes, gene products and sequences (also see http://www.sequenceontology.org/). The ontologies have been extended and refined for several biological areas, and improvements to the structure of the ontologies have been implemented. To improve the quantity and quality of gene product annotations available from its public repository, the GO Consortium… 

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