The Gene Ontology: enhancements for 2011

@article{Blake2012TheGO,
  title={The Gene Ontology: enhancements for 2011},
  author={Judith A. Blake and Mary Eileen Dolan and Harold J. Drabkin and David P. Hill and Li Ni and Dmitry Sitnikov and Shane C. Burgess and Teresia J. Buza and Cathy R. Gresham and Fiona M. McCarthy and Lakshmikumar Pillai and Hui Wang and Seth Carbon and Suzanna E. Lewis and Chris J. Mungall and Pascale Gaudet and Rex L. Chisholm and Petra Fey and W. Kibbe and Siddhartha Basu and Deborah A. Siegele and Brenley K. McIntosh and Daniel P. Renfro and Adrienne E. Zweifel and James C. Hu and Nicholas H. Brown and Susan Tweedie and Yasmin Alam-Faruque and Rolf Apweiler and A. Auchinchloss and Kristian B. Axelsen and Ghislaine Argoud-Puy and Benoit Bely and Marie-Claude Blatter and Lydie Bougueleret and Emmanuel Boutet and S. Branconi-Quintaje and Lionel Breuza and Alan James Bridge and Paul Browne and W. M. Chan and Elisabeth Coudert and Isabelle Cusin and Emily Dimmer and Paula Duek-Roggli and Ruth Y. Eberhardt and Anne Estreicher and Livia Famiglietti and S. Ferro-Rojas and Marc Feuermann and Michael Gardner and Arnaud Gos and Nadine Gruaz-Gumowski and Ursula Hinz and Chantal Hulo and Rachael P. Huntley and Janet James and Silvia Jimenez and Florence Jungo and Guillaume Keller and Kati Laiho and D Legge and Phillippe Lemercier and Damien Lieberherr and Michele Magrane and Maria Jesus Martin and Patrick Masson and Madelaine Moinat and Claire O’Donovan and Ivo Pedruzzi and Klemens Pichler and Diego Poggioli and Pablo Porras Mill{\'a}n and Sylvain Poux and Catherine Rivoire and Bernd Roechert and Tony Sawford and Michel Schneider and Harminder Sehra and Eleanor Stanley and Andre Stutz and Shyamala Sundaram and Michael Tognolli and Ioannis Xenarios and Rebecca E. Foulger and Jane Lomax and Paola Roncaglia and Evelyn Camon and Varsha K. Khodiyar and Ruth C. Lovering and Philippa J. Talmud and Marcus C. Chibucos and Michelle G. Giglio and Kara Dolinski and Sven Heinicke and Michael S. Livstone and Ralf Stephan and Midori A. Harris and Stephen G. Oliver and Kim M Rutherford and Valerie Wood and J{\"u}rg B{\"a}hler and Antonia Lock and Paul Julian Kersey and Mark D. McDowall and Daniel M. Staines and Melinda R. Dwinell and Mary Shimoyama and Stanley J. F. Laulederkind and Tom Hayman and Shur-Jen Wang and Victoria Petri and Timothy Lowry and Peter D’Eustachio and Lisa Matthews and Craig Amundsen and Rama Balakrishnan and Gail Binkley and J. Michael Cherry and Karen R. Christie and Maria C. Costanzo and Selina S. Dwight and Stacia R. Engel and Dianna G. Fisk and Jodi E. Hirschman and Benjamin C. Hitz and Eurie L. Hong and Kalpana Karra and Cynthia J. Krieger and Stuart R. Miyasato and Robert S. Nash and Jason Y. Park and Marek S. Skrzypek and Shuai Weng and Edith D. Wong and Tanya Z. Berardini and Donghui Li and Eva Huala and Donna K. Slonim and Heather C. Wick and Prasanth Thomas and Juancarlos Chan and Ranjana Kishore and Paul W. Sternberg and Kimberly Van Auken and Douglas G. Howe and Monte Westerfield},
  journal={Nucleic Acids Research},
  year={2012},
  volume={40},
  pages={D559 - D564}
}
The Gene Ontology (GO) (http://www.geneontology.org) is a community bioinformatics resource that represents gene product function through the use of structured, controlled vocabularies. The number of GO annotations of gene products has increased due to curation efforts among GO Consortium (GOC) groups, including focused literature-based annotation and ortholog-based functional inference. The GO ontologies continue to expand and improve as a result of targeted ontology development, including the… 

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