The Gender-Equality Paradox in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Education

@article{Stoet2018TheGP,
  title={The Gender-Equality Paradox in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Education},
  author={Gijsbert Stoet and David C. Geary},
  journal={Psychological Science},
  year={2018},
  volume={29},
  pages={581 - 593}
}
The underrepresentation of girls and women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields is a continual concern for social scientists and policymakers. Using an international database on adolescent achievement in science, mathematics, and reading (N = 472,242), we showed that girls performed similarly to or better than boys in science in two of every three countries, and in nearly all countries, more girls appeared capable of college-level STEM study than had enrolled… 

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