The Gender Division of Labour in Early Modern England

@article{Whittle2018TheGD,
  title={The Gender Division of Labour in Early Modern England},
  author={Jane Whittle and Mark Hailwood},
  journal={Wiley-Blackwell: Economic History Review},
  year={2018}
}
This article presents new evidence of gendered work patterns in the pre‐industrial economy, providing an overview of women's work in early modern England. Evidence of 4,300 work tasks undertaken by particular women and men was collected from three types of court documents (coroners’ reports, church court depositions, and quarter sessions examinations) from five counties in south‐western England (Cornwall, Devon, Hampshire, Somerset, and Wiltshire) between 1500 and 1700. The… Expand
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