The Future of Time: UTC and the Leap Second

@article{Finkleman2011TheFO,
  title={The Future of Time: UTC and the Leap Second},
  author={David Cssi Finkleman and Steve Allen and John H. Seago and Robert L. Seaman and P. Seidelmann},
  journal={arXiv: Instrumentation and Methods for Astrophysics},
  year={2011}
}
Before atomic timekeeping, clocks were set to the skies. But starting in 1972, radio signals began broadcasting atomic seconds and leap seconds have occasionally been added to that stream of atomic seconds to keep the signals synchronized with the actual rotation of Earth. Such adjustments were considered necessary because Earth's rotation is less regular than atomic timekeeping. In January 2012, a United Nations-affiliated organization could permanently break this link by redefining… 
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