The Future of Social Movement Organizations

@article{Earl2015TheFO,
  title={The Future of Social Movement Organizations},
  author={Jennifer Earl},
  journal={American Behavioral Scientist},
  year={2015},
  volume={59},
  pages={35 - 52}
}
  • J. Earl
  • Published 2015
  • Political Science
  • American Behavioral Scientist
This article examines the role of social movement organizations (SMOs) in Internet activism. While SMOs may still play a vital role in offline protest that is facilitated online, I argue that SMOs do not necessarily offer strong returns on investment for forms of protest in which participation occurs online or in which entire movements are organized online. Specifically, I argue that several critical functions for SMOs in offline social movements are not as applicable online, rendering SMOs… Expand
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Existing studies of social movement organizations (SMOs) commonly focus only on a small number of well-known SMOs or SMOs that belong to a single social movement industry (SMI). This is partiallyExpand
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The role of social media (e.g. Facebook, YouTube, Twitter) in social movements has become the subject of academic and media discussion. This attention can be framed as debates over whether socialExpand
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Under what conditions do nation-wide mass protests in authoritarian regimes produce new local activist organizations? Based on sixty-five interviews and over 1,000media reports, internal documents,Expand
ROUTING AROUND ORGANIZATIONS: SELF-DIRECTED POLITICAL CONSUMPTION*
Recent research on activism in the context of digital media has argued that organizing can happen outside of organizations and even without SMOs. This work has been focused primarily on the “supplyExpand
Barrier or Booster? Digital Media, Social Networks, and Youth Micromobilization
Research on young people’s protest participation has focused on how the family, peers, and institutions support activism and micromobilization. But digital and social media usage has arguably alteredExpand
Observing protest: media use and student involvement on 7 April 2010 in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan
Individuals in and around protests are generally classified as either participants or nonparticipants. However, observers witnessing protests can also play an important role in collective actions byExpand
Observing protest: media use and student involvement on 7 April 2010 in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan
Individuals in and around protests are generally classified as either participants or nonparticipants. However, observers witnessing protests can also play an important role in collective actions byExpand
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ON THE CUSP OF A MOVEMENT: IDENTITY WORK AND SOCIAL MOVEMENT IDENTIFICATION PROCESSES WITHIN FATHERS' RIGHTS GROUPS
Individuals who belong to social movement organizations (SMOs) do not necessarily identify themselves with the larger social movement overall. This sharp disconnect presents challenges to highlyExpand
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Why did some social movement organization (SMO) families receive extensive media coverage? In this article, we elaborate and appraise four core arguments in the literature on movements and theirExpand
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