The Functional Neuroanatomy of Maternal Love: Mother’s Response to Infant’s Attachment Behaviors

@article{Noriuchi2008TheFN,
  title={The Functional Neuroanatomy of Maternal Love: Mother’s Response to Infant’s Attachment Behaviors},
  author={Madoka Noriuchi and Yoshiaki Kikuchi and Atsushi Senoo},
  journal={Biological Psychiatry},
  year={2008},
  volume={63},
  pages={415-423}
}
BACKGROUND Maternal love, which may be the core of maternal behavior, is essential for the mother-infant attachment relationship and is important for the infant's development and mental health. However, little has been known about these neural mechanisms in human mothers. We examined patterns of maternal brain activation in response to infant cues using video clips. METHODS We performed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measurements while 13 mothers viewed video clips, with no… Expand
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