• Corpus ID: 154467011

The Frenzy of Renown: Fame and Its History

@inproceedings{Braudy1986TheFO,
  title={The Frenzy of Renown: Fame and Its History},
  author={Leo Braudy},
  year={1986}
}
"Remarkably ambitious . . . an impressive tour de force." --Washington Post Book WorldFor Alexander the Great, fame meant accomplishing what no mortal had ever accomplished before. For Julius Caesar, personal glory was indistinguishable from that of Rome. The early Christians devalued public recognition, believing that the only true audience was God. And Marilyn Monroe owed much of her fame to the fragility that led to self-destruction. These are only some of the dozens of figures that populate… 

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