The French paradox: lessons for other countries

@article{Ferrires2004TheFP,
  title={The French paradox: lessons for other countries},
  author={Jean Ferri{\`e}res},
  journal={Heart},
  year={2004},
  volume={90},
  pages={107 - 111}
}
“Life is the art of drawing sufficient conclusions from insufficient premises”—Samuel Butler The French paradox is the observation of low coronary heart disease (CHD) death rates despite high intake of dietary cholesterol and saturated fat.1,2 The French paradox concept was formulated by French epidemiologists3 in the 1980s. France is actually a country with low CHD incidence and mortality (table 1). The mean energy supplied by fat was 38% in Belfast and 36% in Toulouse in 1985–86.4 More… 
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