The Foreign Office and the 1939 Royal Visit to America: Courting the USA in an Era of Isolationism

@article{Bell2002TheFO,
  title={The Foreign Office and the 1939 Royal Visit to America: Courting the USA in an Era of Isolationism},
  author={P. Bell},
  journal={Journal of Contemporary History},
  year={2002},
  volume={37},
  pages={599 - 616}
}
  • P. Bell
  • Published 2002
  • History
  • Journal of Contemporary History
The visit of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth to the USA in June 1939, the first by a British monarch, seemed to symbolize, at a time of escalating danger, the solidarity of the English-speaking peoples. The occasion's significance was jocularly captured in a Gaumont newsreel: against images of the royal couple escorted along Pennsylvania Avenue, the narrator declares that the last time the British had gone there it had been 'to burn the White House'.1 Extending a state visit to Canada, the… Expand
The British Government, the First DRC Enquiry and the United States, 1933-34
The failure of the United States to play a more active role during the 1930s in the containment of international aggression remains an important issue for historians interested in whether World WarExpand
The Royal Tour of 1939 as a Media Event
Abstract: This article examines three radio broadcasts from the royal tour of 1939, namely those covering the departure of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth from Niagara Falls, Ontario, on their wayExpand
Leaving Us in the Lurch
The failure of the United States to play a more active role during the 1930s in the containment of international aggression remains an important issue for historians interested in whether World WarExpand
France, Britain and the United States in the 1930s until the Fall of France
The main thrust of this chapter, in some contrast to the previous one, will be to examine the Franco-American relationship of the 1930s, with the British somewhat in the background. The rationale forExpand
Joseph P. Kennedy, 1938–40
‘“I have made arrangements to have Joe Kennedy watched hourly — and the first time he opens his mouth and criticises me, I will fire him”.’1 These remarks from President Franklin D. Roosevelt inExpand
The British Monarchy And Empire: The Formal and Informal Power of the Monarchy In Relation To the Empire From Queen Elizabeth I to Queen Elizabeth II
The relationship between the British Empire and the monarchy of Britain is an understudied aspect of the history of Britain. Examining the monarchy from the reign of Queen Elizabeth I to the reign ofExpand
Powerless and Frustrated: Britain's Relationship With China During the Opening Years of the Second Sino–Japanese War, 1937–1939
Foreign policy is multi-faceted. It was not only diplomatic, political, socio-cultural, economic, Imperial, and strategic factors that structured—and limited—Britain's foreign policy during theExpand
George VI in cartoons: the king vanishes
ABSTRACT This article examines the depiction of George VI in cartoons. These important hybrid journalistic/artistic forms reflect a subtle shift in understandings of the monarchy, from emphasisingExpand
Humphrey Jennings at the fair: spare time, family portrait, and the rhetoric of national identity
The popularizing support of critic and filmmaker Lindsay Anderson (1923-1994) has long dominated public understanding of the work of filmmaker and intellectual polymath Humphrey Jennings (1907-1950).Expand
Relations with the British and French
...
1
2
...