The Foot and Ankle of Australopithecus sediba

@article{Zipfel2011TheFA,
  title={The Foot and Ankle of Australopithecus sediba},
  author={Bernhard Zipfel and Jeremy M. DeSilva and Robert S. Kidd and Kristian J. Carlson and Steven Emilio Churchill and Lee R. Berger},
  journal={Science},
  year={2011},
  volume={333},
  pages={1417 - 1420}
}
Australopithecus sediba had a human-like ankle and arch but an ape-like heel and tibia, implying that while bipedal, this species was also adept at climbing trees. A well-preserved and articulated partial foot and ankle of Australopithecus sediba, including an associated complete adult distal tibia, talus, and calcaneus, have been discovered at the Malapa site, South Africa, and reported in direct association with the female paratype Malapa Hominin 2. These fossils reveal a mosaic of primitive… 
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