The Flashlight Fish Anomalops katoptron Uses Bioluminescent Light to Detect Prey in the Dark

@article{Hellinger2017TheFF,
  title={The Flashlight Fish Anomalops katoptron Uses Bioluminescent Light to Detect Prey in the Dark},
  author={Jens Hellinger and Peter J{\"a}gers and Marcel Donner and Franziska Sutt and Melanie D. Mark and Budiono Senen and Ralph Tollrian and Stefan Herlitze},
  journal={PLoS ONE},
  year={2017},
  volume={12}
}
Bioluminescence is a fascinating phenomenon occurring in numerous animal taxa in the ocean. The reef dwelling splitfin flashlight fish (Anomalops katoptron) can be found in large schools during moonless nights in the shallow water of coral reefs and in the open surrounding water. Anomalops katoptron produce striking blink patterns with symbiotic bacteria in their sub-ocular light organs. We examined the blink frequency in A. katoptron under various laboratory conditions. During the night A… 
Visual tuning in the flashlight fish Anomalops katoptron to detect blue, bioluminescent light
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Fish with red fluorescent eyes forage more efficiently under dim, blue-green light conditions
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This outcome corroborates previous predictions that fluorescence may be an adaptation to blue-green, heavily shaded environments, which coincides with the opportunistic biology of this species that lives in the transition zone between exposed and heavilyShaded microhabitats.
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