The First Pulse of the Extremely Bright GRB 130427A: A Test Lab for Synchrotron Shocks

@article{Preece2014TheFP,
  title={The First Pulse of the Extremely Bright GRB 130427A: A Test Lab for Synchrotron Shocks},
  author={Robert D. Preece and J. Michael Burgess and Andreas von Kienlin and P. Narayana Bhat and M S Briggs and David Byrne and Vandiver Chaplin and William H. Cleveland and Andrew C. Collazzi and Valerie Connaughton and Anne M. Diekmann and Gerard Fitzpatrick and Suzanne Foley and Melissa H. Gibby and Misty M. Giles and Adam Goldstein and Jochen Greiner and David Gruber and Peter Jenke and R. Marc Kippen and Chryssa Kouveliotou and Sheila McBreen and Charles A. Meegan and William S. Paciesas and V{\'e}ronique Pelassa and Dave Tierney and Alexander J. van der Horst and Colleen A. Wilson-Hodge and Shaolin Xiong and George Younes and H.-F. Yu and Markus Ackermann and Marco Ajello and Magnus Axelsson and Luca Baldini and Guido Barbiellini and Matthew G. Baring and Denis Bastieri and Ronaldo Bellazzini and Elisabetta Bissaldi and Emanuele Bonamente and Johan Bregeon and Monica Brigida and Pascal Bruel and Rolf Buehler and Sara Buson and G. A. Caliandro and R. A. Cameron and Patrizia A. Caraveo and Claudia Cecchi and Eric Charles and A. Chekhtman and J. Chiang and Graziano Chiaro and Stefano Ciprini and Richard O. Claus and J. Cohen-Tanugi and Lynn R. Cominsky and Janet M. Conrad and Filippo D’Ammando and Alessandro De Angelis and Francesco de Palma and Charles D. Dermer and R. Desiante and S. W. Digel and Leonardo Di Venere and P. S. Drell and Alex Drlica-Wagner and Cecilia Favuzzi and Anna Franckowiak and Yasushi Fukazawa and Piergiorgio Fusco and Fabio Gargano and Neil A. Gehrels and Stefano Germani and Nicola Giglietto and Francesco Giordano and Marcello Giroletti and Gary Lunt Godfrey and Jonathan Granot and Isabelle A. Grenier and Sylvain Guiriec and D. Hadasch and Yoshitaka Hanabata and Alice K. Harding and Masaaki Hayashida and Shabnam Iyyani and T. Jogler and Guðlaugur J{\'o}hannesson and Taro Kawano and J{\"u}rgen Kn{\"o}dlseder and Daniel Kocevski and Michael Kuss and Joshua Lande and Josefin Larsson and Stefan Larsson and Luca Latronico and Francesco Longo and Francesco Loparco and Michael N. Lovellette and Pasquale Lubrano and Matthias P. Mayer and Mario Nicola Mazziotta and P. F. Michelson and Tsunefumi Mizuno and M. E. Monzani and Enrico Moretti and A. Morselli and Simona Murgia and Rodrigo S. Nemmen and Eric Nuss and Tanja K. Nymark and Masanori Ohno and Takashi Ohsugi and Akira Okumura and Nicola Omodei and Monica Orienti and D. Paneque and Jeremy S. Perkins and Melissa Pesce-Rollins and F. Piron and G. Pivato and Troy A. Porter and Judith L. Racusin and S. Rain{\'o} and R. Rando and Massimiliano Razzano and Soebur Razzaque and Anita Reimer and O. Reimer and Steven M. Ritz and Markus Roth and Felix Ryde and A. Sartori and Jeffrey D. Scargle and Alex Schulz and Carmelo Sgro’ and Eric J. Siskind and Gloria Spandre and Paolo Spinelli and Daniel J. Suson and Hiroyasu Tajima and H. Takahashi and John Gregg Thayer and Jana Thayer and Luigi Tibaldo and Marco Tinivella and Diego F. Torres and Gino Tosti and Eleonora Troja and T. L. Usher and Justin Vandenbroucke and Vlasios Vasileiou and Giacomo Vianello and Vincenzo Vitale and M. Werner and B. L. Winer and Kent S. Wood and S. J. Zhu},
  journal={Science},
  year={2014},
  volume={343},
  pages={51 - 54}
}
Bright Lights Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), bright flashes of gamma-ray light, are thought to be associated with the collapse of massive stars. GRB 130427A was detected on 27 April 2013, and it had the longest gamma-ray duration and one of the largest isotropic energy releases observed to date (see the Perspective by Fynbo). Ackermann et al. (p. 42, published online 21 November) report data obtained with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope, which reveal a high-energy spectral component that cannot… 

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Fermi-LAT Observations of the Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 130427A

Temporal and spectral analyses of GRB 130427A challenge the widely accepted model that the nonthermal high-energy emission in the afterglow phase of GRBs is synchrotron emission radiated by electrons accelerated at an external shock.

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