The Financial Legacy of Iraq and Afghanistan: How Wartime Spending Decisions Will Constrain Future National Security Budgets

@article{Bilmes2013TheFL,
  title={The Financial Legacy of Iraq and Afghanistan: How Wartime Spending Decisions Will Constrain Future National Security Budgets},
  author={Linda J. Bilmes},
  journal={ERN: Other Political Economy: Budget},
  year={2013}
}
  • Linda J. Bilmes
  • Published 26 March 2013
  • Political Science
  • ERN: Other Political Economy: Budget
The Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts, taken together, will be the most expensive wars in US history--totaling somewhere between $4 to $6 trillion. This includes long-term medical care and disability compensation for service members, veterans and families, military replenishment and social and economic costs. The largest portion of that bill is yet to be paid. Since 2001, the US has expanded the quality, quantity, availability and eligibility of benefits for military personnel and veterans. This… 
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U.S. War Costs: Two Parts Temporary, One Part Permanent
The impact of American and British involvement in Afghanistan and Iraq on health spending, military spending and economic growth
Abstract Had there been no involvement in Afghanistan and Iraq, how much lower would military and health spending have been in the US and the UK? And what is the total effect of war on real output