The Father of Ethology and the Foster Mother of Ducks: Konrad Lorenz as Expert on Motherhood

@article{Vicedo2009TheFO,
  title={The Father of Ethology and the Foster Mother of Ducks: Konrad Lorenz as Expert on Motherhood},
  author={Marga Vicedo},
  journal={Isis},
  year={2009},
  volume={100},
  pages={263 - 291}
}
  • M. Vicedo
  • Published 1 June 2009
  • Sociology, Medicine
  • Isis
Konrad Lorenz's popularity in the United States has to be understood in the context of social concern about the mother‐infant dyad after World War II. Child analysts David Levy, René Spitz, Margarethe Ribble, Therese Benedek, and John Bowlby argued that many psychopathologies were caused by a disruption in the mother‐infant bond. Lorenz extended his work on imprinting to humans and argued that maternal care was also instinctual. The conjunction of psychoanalysis and ethology helped shore up the… 
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Introduction
On the history and significance of objectivity in science see Lorraine Daston and Peter Galison
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