The Fatal Politics of the PRC's Great Leap Famine: the preface to Tombstone

@article{Jisheng2010TheFP,
  title={The Fatal Politics of the PRC's Great Leap Famine: the preface to Tombstone},
  author={Yang Jisheng},
  journal={Journal of Contemporary China},
  year={2010},
  volume={19},
  pages={755 - 776}
}
  • Y. Jisheng
  • Published 2010
  • Sociology
  • Journal of Contemporary China
What follows is the Preface to Tombstone (), Yang Jisheng's two-volume investigative study of China's Great Famine that claimed some 36 million lives in the late 1950s and early 1960s. The book was published in Hong Kong in 2008 and was banned on the mainland. The death toll was unprecedented and remains unmatched in Chinese or world history. The Chinese Communist Party (CCP) has tried to cover up the terrible reality by classifying key information as secret and placing the blame elsewhere, as… Expand
Great Leap into Famine: A Review Essay
Frank Dikotter's Mao's Great Famine: The History of China's Most Devastating Ca tastrophe, 1958-1962 is the longest and most detailed study of the Great Leap Forward (GLF) famine to appear in EnglishExpand
Estimating the Long-Term Impact of the Great Chinese Famine (1959–61) on Modern China
Summary This research analyzes the long-term impact of the Great Chinese Famine (1959–61) on the modern Chinese economy, and shows that areas in which famine was most severe have significantly lowerExpand
Essays estimating the impact of historical public health crises on development and the human condition
Essays Estimating the Impact of Historical Public Health Crises on Development and the Human Condition By Elizabeth Fair Gooch August 2014 Committee Chair: Jorge Martinez-Vazquez Major Department:Expand
The income body weight gradients in the developing economy of China.
TLDR
Investigating the case of China suggests that higher income is positively related to future growth of individuals' BMI in less developed areas but negatively related to BMI growth in more developed areas, and that concentrations of overweight are "trickling down" to lower income ranks as regions become more developed. Expand