The Exopolysaccharide Alginate Protects Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Bacteria from IFN-γ-Mediated Macrophage Killing1

@article{Leid2005TheEA,
  title={The Exopolysaccharide Alginate Protects Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Bacteria from IFN-$\gamma$-Mediated Macrophage Killing1},
  author={Jeff G. Leid and Carey J Willson and Mark E. Shirtliff and D. Hassett and Matthew R. Parsek and Alyssa K Jeffers},
  journal={The Journal of Immunology},
  year={2005},
  volume={175},
  pages={7512 - 7518}
}
The ability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to form biofilms and cause chronic infections in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients is well documented. Numerous studies have revealed that P. aeruginosa biofilms are highly refractory to antibiotics. However, dramatically fewer studies have addressed P. aeruginosa biofilm resistance to the host’s immune system. In planktonic, unattached (nonbiofilm) P. aeruginosa, the exopolysaccharide alginate provides protection against a variety of host factors yet… 

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