The Evolving Landscape of the Columbia River Gorge: Lewis and Clark and Cataclysms on the Columbia

@article{OConnor2004TheEL,
  title={The Evolving Landscape of the Columbia River Gorge: Lewis and Clark and Cataclysms on the Columbia},
  author={Jim E. O’Connor},
  journal={Oregon Historical Quarterly},
  year={2004}
}
  • J. O’Connor
  • Published 22 September 2004
  • Geology
  • Oregon Historical Quarterly

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