The Evolutionary Enigma of Mixed Mating Systems in Plants: Occurrence, Theoretical Explanations, and Empirical Evidence

@article{Goodwillie2005TheEE,
  title={The Evolutionary Enigma of Mixed Mating Systems in Plants: Occurrence, Theoretical Explanations, and Empirical Evidence},
  author={Carol Goodwillie and Susan Kalisz and Christopher G. Eckert},
  journal={Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics},
  year={2005},
  volume={36},
  pages={47-79}
}
▪ Abstract Mixed mating, in which hermaphrodite plant species reproduce by both self- and cross-fertilization, presents a challenging problem for evolutionary biologists. Theory suggests that inbreeding depression, the main selective factor opposing the evolution of selfing, can be purged with self-fertilization, a process that is expected to yield pure strategies of either outcrossing or selfing. Here we present updated evidence suggesting that mixed mating systems are frequent in seed plants… Expand

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