The Evolution of Social Monogamy in Mammals

@article{Lukas2013TheEO,
  title={The Evolution of Social Monogamy in Mammals},
  author={Dieter Lukas and Tim H. Clutton-Brock},
  journal={Science},
  year={2013},
  volume={341},
  pages={526 - 530}
}
The Only Flame in Town Unusual for mammals, humans are notably socially monogamous, with pair bonding sometimes lasting decades. Why? Lukas and Clutton-Brock (p. 526; see the Perspective by Kappeler) examined data from over 2500 mammalian species across 26 orders containing 60 evolutionary transitions to monogamy. In every case, the ancestral condition was one where females were solitary and where male infanticide was unusual. Monogamy appears to arise not as a response to a need for paternal… Expand
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