The Evolution of Social Behavior in Insects and Arachnids: Interactions among males, females and offspring in bark and ambrosia beetles: the significance of living in tunnels for the evolution of social behavior

@inproceedings{Kirkendall1997TheEO,
  title={The Evolution of Social Behavior in Insects and Arachnids: Interactions among males, females and offspring in bark and ambrosia beetles: the significance of living in tunnels for the evolution of social behavior},
  author={Lawrence R. Kirkendall and Deborah S. Kent and Kenneth F. Raffa},
  year={1997}
}
THE BEHAVIORAL ROLE OF MALES OF Platypus quercivorus Murayama IN THEIR SUBSOCIAL COLONIES
TLDR
The behavioral role of male ambrosia beetles, Platypus quercivorus, in subsocial colonies both field and laboratory has been investigated and an inhabitant male seems to have three responsibilities; protection of the gallery from invaders, protection of progeny (larva) from falling down and also keeping the gallery clean from frass.
TWO ACTIVE STAGES OF THE AMBROSIA BEETLE, Platypus quercivorus MURAYAMA ESTIMATED FROM FRASS PRODUCTION
TLDR
Beetle activity deep inside wood was studied in field and laboratory conditions by monitoring the type and amount of frass ejected from beetle galleries of Platypus quercivorus, finding that the duration of the fibrous frass production was clearly different between galleries, ranging from five to twenty one days.
Inbreeding, but not seed availability, affects dispersal and reproductive success in a seed-inhabiting social beetle
TLDR
It is suggested that colony social organization in this species is strongly influenced by the level of relatedness among colony members, and that care of the eggs by adult females is obligate for offspring development.
Patterns of parental care in invertebrates
TLDR
The origins and transitions of extended care in invertebrates are confined primarily to post-fertilization traits that increase offspring fitness, beyond the temporary housing and passage of the fertilized egg within the female.
Fungus Cultivation by Ambrosia Beetles: Behavior and Laboratory Breeding Success in Three Xyleborine Species
TLDR
It is proposed that the laboratory techniques proposed here are suited for extensive studies of sociality and modes of agriculture in the xyleborine ambrosia beetles, which may yield important insights into the evolution of fungal agriculture and advanced social organization.
Chemical Ecology and Mechanisms of Reproductive Isolation in Ambrosia Beetles
TLDR
Examination of the symbiotic fungal associations of the four native ambrosia beetles and the established exotic T. domesticum revealed overlapping combinations of fungal isolates among the genera Ophiostoma, Ambrosiella, and Ceratocystiopsis, with no evidence of co-evolution between fungi and their beetle vectors.
Evaluating Sexual Dimorphism in the Ambrosia Beetle Xyleborus affinis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Using Geometric Morphometrics
Abstract Species within genus Xyleborus Eichhoff (Curculionidae: Scolytinae) live in a feeding symbiosis with ambrosia fungi and present inbreeding polygyny with highly biased sex ratios and sexual
Habitat Quality Determines Dispersal Decisions and Fitness in a Beetle – Fungus Mutualism
TLDR
This study found that the vertically transmitted ambrosia fungus garden is composed of at least two fungus mutualist species and a wide variety of other microbes varying in their relative abundance, allowing the beetles to utilise a broad range of substrates over prolonged time during which the wood gradually desiccates.
Cycloheximide-Producing Streptomyces Associated With Xyleborinus saxesenii and Xyleborus affinis Fungus-Farming Ambrosia Beetles
TLDR
The consistent isolation of a single 16S phylotype of Streptomyces from two species of ambrosia beetles, and the finding that a representative isolate of this phylotype produces cycloheximide, which inhibits a parasite of the system but not the cultivated fungus, suggests that these actinobacteria may play defensive roles within these systems.
Influence of seasonality and climate on captures of wood-boring Coleoptera (Bostrichidae and Curculionidae (Scolytinae and Platypodinae)) using ethanol-baited traps in a seasonal tropical forest of northern Thailand
TLDR
It is indicated that seasonality in temperature and rainfall caused a 1-yr cycle in flying beetles of a majority of the more abundant species, and synchrony among species, which resulted in the 1-yrs cycle of TTC.
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