The Evolution of Marine Reptiles

@article{Motani2009TheEO,
  title={The Evolution of Marine Reptiles},
  author={Ryosuke Motani},
  journal={Evolution: Education and Outreach},
  year={2009},
  volume={2},
  pages={224-235}
}
  • R. Motani
  • Published 19 May 2009
  • Environmental Science, Geography
  • Evolution: Education and Outreach
Reptiles have repeatedly invaded marine environments despite their physiological constraints as air breathers. Marine reptiles were especially successful in the Mesozoic as major predators in the sea. There were more than a dozen groups of marine reptiles in the Mesozoic, of which four had more than 30 genera, namely sauropterygians (including plesiosaurs), ichthyopterygians, mosasaurs, and sea turtles. Medium-sized groups, such as Thalattosauria and Thalattosuchia, had about ten genera… 
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