The Evolution of Flight in Bats: Narrowing the Field of Plausible Hypotheses

@article{Bishop2008TheEO,
  title={The Evolution of Flight in Bats: Narrowing the Field of Plausible Hypotheses},
  author={Kristin L Bishop},
  journal={The Quarterly Review of Biology},
  year={2008},
  volume={83},
  pages={153 - 169}
}
  • Kristin L Bishop
  • Published 1 June 2008
  • Biology, Medicine
  • The Quarterly Review of Biology
The evolution of flapping flight in bats from an arboreal gliding ancestor appears on the surface to be a relatively simple transition. However, bat flight is a highly complex functional system from a morphological, physiological, and aerodynamic perspective, and the transition from a gliding precursor may involve functional discontinuities that represent evolutionary hurdles. In this review, I suggest a framework for a comprehensive treatment of the evolution of complex functional systems that… 
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