The Evolution of Endothermy in Terrestrial Vertebrates: Who? When? Why?

@article{Hillenius2004TheEO,
  title={The Evolution of Endothermy in Terrestrial Vertebrates: Who? When? Why?},
  author={W. J. Hillenius and J. Ruben},
  journal={Physiological and Biochemical Zoology},
  year={2004},
  volume={77},
  pages={1019 - 1042}
}
Avian and mammalian endothermy results from elevated rates of resting, or routine, metabolism and enables these animals to maintain high and stable body temperatures in the face of variable ambient temperatures. Endothermy is also associated with enhanced stamina and elevated capacity for aerobic metabolism during periods of prolonged activity. These attributes of birds and mammals have greatly contributed to their widespread distribution and ecological success. Unfortunately, since few… Expand
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