The Evolution of Cooperative Hunting

@article{Packer1988TheEO,
  title={The Evolution of Cooperative Hunting},
  author={Craig Packer and Lore Megan Ruttan},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={1988},
  volume={132},
  pages={159 - 198}
}
Using a series of game-theoretical models, we develop two major predictions concerning the evolution of cooperative hunting. First, we specify the conditions under which individuals should hunt in groups rather than solitarily. When a group captures only a single prey per hunt, the expected benefits from cooperation rarely outweigh the advantages of hunting alone, since the prey must be divided between group members. Cooperation to capture the same prey can confer sufficient mutual benefit only… Expand
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