The Evolution of Animal Domestication

@article{Larson2014TheEO,
  title={The Evolution of Animal Domestication},
  author={Greger Larson and Dorian Q. Fuller},
  journal={Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics},
  year={2014},
  volume={45},
  pages={115-136}
}
  • G. Larson, D. Fuller
  • Published 24 November 2014
  • Biology
  • Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics
The domestication of plants and animals over the past 11,500 years has had a significant effect not just on the domesticated taxa but also on human evolution and on the biosphere as a whole. Decades of research into the geographical and chronological origins of domestic animals have led to a general understanding of the pattern and process of domestication, though a number of significant questions remain unresolved. Here, building upon recent theoretical advances regarding the different… Expand

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