The Evolution of Alloparental Care and Adoption in Mammals and Birds

@article{Riedman1982TheEO,
  title={The Evolution of Alloparental Care and Adoption in Mammals and Birds},
  author={Marianne L. Riedman},
  journal={The Quarterly Review of Biology},
  year={1982},
  volume={57},
  pages={405 - 435}
}
  • M. Riedman
  • Published 2 April 1982
  • Biology
  • The Quarterly Review of Biology
Alloparental care and adoption of young, aparently altruistic and reproductively costly behaviors, have been reported in over 120 mammalian and 150 avian species. Members of these taxonomically and ecologically diverse species often share similar behavioral and sociecological strategies in parental care, and may practice strikingly convergent forms of allopareting, such as "babysitting" behavior. Individuals that care for alien young may acquire selective advantages associated with increased… 
Do Foster Mothers from Socially Hierarchical Primate Species "Selfishly" Adopt Orphans?
TLDR
It is demonstrated that adult parous female cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis), in the absence of their social group, display exclusive adoption of their own biological offspring by failing to adopt non-kin orphan infants independent of the physical presence of their infant kin or maternal status.
Parental and Alloparental Care in a Polygynous Mammal
TLDR
It is indicated that sisters can form stable cooperative relationships, but members of a communal nest allocate their caregiving to individual offspring according to potential trade-offs between direct and indirect fitness benefits.
Alloparental care in fishes
TLDR
Broad patterns of known examples of alloparental care are described, the pathways to adoption are highlighted, and the ways in whichalloparents derive fitness benefits are highlighted.
Adoption in African wild dogs, Lycaon pictus
TLDR
Immediate and delayed direct benefits identified here are associated with increasing group size and may indicate important mechanisms underlyig adoption and the evolution of helping behaviour in wild dogs.
Adopting behavior and breeding biology of avocets: benefits of large broods for good parents?
TLDR
It is concluded that adoption may be a means to increase the size of the brood for certain, high-quality pairs without incurring the costs of producing and incubating more eggs.
Non-kin adoption in the common vampire bat
Individual animals across many different species occasionally ‘adopt’ unrelated, orphaned offspring. Although adoption may be best explained as a by-product of adaptive traits that enhance parental
Drivers of alloparental provisioning of fledglings in a colonially breeding bird
TLDR
Using automated monitoring of replicated captive zebra finch colonies, this study suggests that allofeeding is consistent with group augmentation, potentially benefiting adults through colony maintenance or increased offspring survival.
Variation in Individual Investment Strategies among Social Animals
TLDR
It is demonstrated that some of the differences in behaviours in social animals are because of environmental factors, which may be associated with ‘reaction norms’ or the genotype’s quantitative phenotypic variation, or which may yield polyethisms.
Adopting kin enhances inclusive fitness in asocial red squirrels.
TLDR
By focusing on adoption in an asocial species, this study provides a clear test of Hamilton's rule that explains the persistence of occasional altruism in a natural mammal population.
A case of alloparental care in the South Island Robin (Petroica australis): Accidental adoption or kin selection?
ABSTRACT It has been suggested that a high degree of relatedness could explain the occurrence of alloparental care in birds, but few studies have confirmed if there is a genetic relationship between
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 109 REFERENCES
COMMUNAL CARE AND KIDNAPPING OF YOUNG BY PARENTAL CICHLIDS
TLDR
Lower vertebrates have not evolved cooperative nursery groups of the kind that constitute the building blocks of mammalian societies, and for other reasons possibly the lack of haplodiploid sex determination or the presence of the right ecological imperatives, they have not become altruistic enough to generate insectlike societies.
Monogamy in Mammals
  • D. Kleiman
  • Biology
    The Quarterly Review of Biology
  • 1977
This review considers the behavioral, ecological, and reproductive characteristics of mammals exhibiting monogamy, i.e., mating exclusivity. From a discussion of the life histories of selected
Origins of Parental Care
Caring for one’s offspring is so widespread among birds and mammals that it is the exceptions that attract our attention. Among birds, megapodes are a special curiosity precisely because their
The Evolution of Social Behavior by Kin Selection
TLDR
A synthesis of current ideas on the evolution of insect sociality shows how mutualism, parental manipulation, and kin selection could all have operated, either in conjunction or independently, to produce extreme altruism (worker sterility) starting with different kinds of primitice groups.
Behavior of a Captive Population of Black-Tailed Prairie Dogs
(I) A colony of black-tailed prairie dogs in the Philadelphia zoo is being used for long term studies of various aspects of social behavior including pattern of social organization, stylized means of
SOME ASPECTS OF PARENT-OFFSPRING AND SIBLING RELATIONS IN A GROUP OF RHESUS MONKEYS, WITH A DISCUSSION OF GROOMING.
  • D. Sade
  • Psychology, Biology
    American journal of physical anthropology
  • 1965
TLDR
It is shown that a rhesus female and her offspring can continue to maintain a distinct relation into the offspring's physical maturity, and that the offspring often develops its strongest relations with monkeys of its own genealogy.
Primate Infant Caregiving Behavior
Field and laboratory data collected upon the Colobinae subfamily of Old World monkeys and, specifically, the Indian langurs (Presbytis entellus) will be used here to raise important questions about
The Evolution of Reciprocal Altruism
  • R. Trivers
  • Psychology
    The Quarterly Review of Biology
  • 1971
A model is presented to account for the natural selection of what is termed reciprocally altruistic behavior. The model shows how selection can operate against the cheater (non-reciprocator) in the
...
1
2
3
4
5
...