The Evolution Of Multiple Mating In Army Ants

@inproceedings{Kronauer2007TheEO,
  title={The Evolution Of Multiple Mating In Army Ants},
  author={Daniel J. C. Kronauer and Robert A. Johnson and Jacobus J. Boomsma},
  booktitle={Evolution; international journal of organic evolution},
  year={2007}
}
Abstract The evolution of mating systems in eusocial Hymenoptera is constrained because females mate only during a brief period early in life, whereas inseminated queens and their stored sperm may live for decades. Considerable research effort during recent years has firmly established that obligate multiple mating has evolved only a few times: in Apis honeybees, Vespula wasps, Pogonomyrmex harvester ants, Atta and Acromyrmex leaf-cutting ants, the ant Cataglyphis cursor, and in at least some… 
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TLDR
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