The European Witch Craze of the 14th to 17th Centuries: A Sociologist's Perspective

@article{benyehuda1980TheEW,
  title={The European Witch Craze of the 14th to 17th Centuries: A Sociologist's Perspective},
  author={N. ben-yehuda},
  journal={American Journal of Sociology},
  year={1980},
  volume={86},
  pages={1 - 31}
}
  • N. ben-yehuda
  • Published 1980
  • Sociology
  • American Journal of Sociology
From the early decades of the 14th century until 1650, continental Europeans executed between 200,000 and 500,000 witches, 85% or more of whom were women. The character and timing of these executions and the persecutions which preceded them were determined in part by changed objectives of the Inquisition, as well as by a differentiation process within medieval society. The which craze answered the need for a redefinition of moral boundaries, as a result of the profound changes in the medieval… Expand

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