The Erasmus Atelectasis Classification: Proposal of a New Classification for Atelectasis of the Middle Ear in Children

@article{Borgstein2007TheEA,
  title={The Erasmus Atelectasis Classification: Proposal of a New Classification for Atelectasis of the Middle Ear in Children},
  author={Johannes A Borgstein and Tatjana Gerritsma and Marjan H. Wieringa and Iain A. Bruce},
  journal={The Laryngoscope},
  year={2007},
  volume={117}
}
Objectives: Atelectasis presents a challenging, often progressive, problem in children. Because of the lack of a clinically practical classification, we introduce a new classification, which in our opinion is more useful in the pediatric age group. This alternative classification enables a more clinically relevant correlation between stage of disease and clinical sequelae and technical difficulty at surgery. 

In Reference to The Erasmus Atelectasis Classification: Proposal of a New Classification for Atelectasis of the Middle Ear in Children

The literature and work of the authors' English colleagues fully support the select applicability of this technique and their worked is fully referenced in this article for those interested in learning the rationale and technical aspects of this approach.

In reference to The Erasmus Atelectasis Classification: Proposal of a New Classification for Atelectasis of the Middle Ear in Children

A new classification for atelectasis of the middle ear in pediatric patients is fittingly described and a new category of atelectatic tympanic membrane is described as type II, which is the tympic membrane adherent only to the promontory without touching the long process of the incus.

In reference to The Erasmus Atelectasis Classification: Proposal of a New Classification for Atelectasis of the Middle Ear in Children

A new classification for atelectasis of the middle ear in pediatric patients is fittingly described and a new category of atelectatic tympanic membrane is described as type II, which is the tympic membrane adherent only to the promontory without touching the long process of the incus.

In reference to Influence of Age on the Surgical Outcome After Endoscopic Sinus Surgery for Chronic Rhinosinusitis With Nasal Polyposis

A new classification for atelectasis of the middle ear in pediatric patients is fittingly described and a new category of atelectatic tympanic membrane is described as type II, which is the tympic membrane adherent only to the promontory without touching the long process of the incus.

Long-term results and prognostic factors of underlay myringoplasty in pars tensa atelectasis in children.

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Tympanic membrane retraction: An endoscopic evaluation of staging systems

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Proposed Clinical Classification of Cholesteatoma

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