The Epstein–Barr virus and the pathogenesis of lymphoma

@article{Vockerodt2015TheEV,
  title={The Epstein–Barr virus and the pathogenesis of lymphoma},
  author={Martina Vockerodt and Lee Fah Yap and Claire Shannon-Lowe and Helen M Curley and Wenbin Wei and Katerina Vrzalikova and Paul G. Murray},
  journal={The Journal of Pathology},
  year={2015},
  volume={235}
}
Since the discovery in 1964 of the Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) in African Burkitt lymphoma, this virus has been associated with a remarkably diverse range of cancer types. Because EBV persists in the B cells of the asymptomatic host, it can easily be envisaged how it contributes to the development of B‐cell lymphomas. However, EBV is also found in other cancers, including T‐cell/natural killer cell lymphomas and several epithelial malignancies. Explaining the aetiological role of EBV is… 
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