The Enteric Nervous System in Intestinal Inflammation

@inproceedings{Sharkey1996TheEN,
  title={The Enteric Nervous System in Intestinal Inflammation},
  author={Keith A Sharkey and Edward J. Parr},
  year={1996}
}
For about 40 years, nerves in the wall of the intestine have been postulated to play a role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Storsteen and colleagues1 were the first to demonstrate that enteric neurons were involved in this process, by providing histological evidence for an increased number of myenteric ganglion cells in chronic ulcerative colitis. Similar observations were also made in Crohn’s disease2. Extrinsic nerves innervating the bowel have also been implicated in… CONTINUE READING

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