The Enlarged Freedom of Frederick Law Olmsted

@article{Menard2010TheEF,
  title={The Enlarged Freedom of Frederick Law Olmsted},
  author={Andrew Menard},
  journal={The New England Quarterly},
  year={2010},
  volume={83},
  pages={508-538}
}
  • Andrew Menard
  • Published 19 August 2010
  • History
  • The New England Quarterly
Frederick Law Olmsted's city parks represent a view of freedom derived from the offsetting influences of an orderly, systematic, public space. The author traces this view to the works of Francis Bacon, John Locke, Archibald Alison, Horace Bushnell, and the liberalism of nineteenth-century New England Whigs. 
6 Citations

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