The Enforcement of the Treaty of Versailles, 1919–1923

@article{Sharp2005TheEO,
  title={The Enforcement of the Treaty of Versailles, 1919–1923},
  author={Alan Sharp},
  journal={Diplomacy \& Statecraft},
  year={2005},
  volume={16},
  pages={423 - 438}
}
  • Alan Sharp
  • Published 1 September 2005
  • Political Science
  • Diplomacy & Statecraft
This paper uses the episode of the Kapp putsch in March 1920 to isolate and analyze a number of high policy themes that dominated the period from the signature of the Treaty of Versailles through to the Franco-Belgian invasion of the Ruhr. These included: the questions of what mechanisms existed to enforce the treaty; the sanctions available to the victorious governments to enforce their will; the position and problems of the German government; the relationship and suspicions existing between… Expand
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