The Endangered Lab Chimp

@article{Cohen2007TheEL,
  title={The Endangered Lab Chimp},
  author={Jon Cohen},
  journal={Science},
  year={2007},
  volume={315},
  pages={450 - 452}
}
  • Jon Cohen
  • Published 26 January 2007
  • Psychology
  • Science
A decline in the number of chimpanzees available for biomedical research in the United States has sparked a growing debate on the opportunities and costs of studies with our closest relatives. (Read more.) 
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